Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
SharePoint

Language Arts Department 

(click on the instructors name to go to their site)

 

ElliganBrown, Cheryl

CherylElliganBrown@usd475.org

Hancock, PatrickPatrickHancock@usd475.org
​Jennett, Cory​CoryJennett@usd475.org
Mason, Cassi
​Poole, Chrstine​ChristinePoole@usd475.org
​Todd, Chelsea

ChelseaTodd@usd475.org

TorresWigton, Lisa
LisaTorresWigton@usd475.org
Wagers, Gina
GinaWagers@usd475.org
 

Courses

English I    

Year──Grade: 9──Credit: 1

Prerequisite: None    

This course will provide students with reading and writing skills necessary to advance to the next level of English.  English I will focus on literary selections from a broad range of sources including Romeo and Juliet, The Odyssey, Maus, and young adult novels by authors such as Chris Crutcher and Walter Dean Myers.  Daily compositions, essay responses, and two research assignments are included in this course.  Homework consists of occasional reading assignments and out-of-class writing. "Students who score below standard on reading formatives and other reading assessments may be placed in Literacy Lab or Reading Seminars."

Honors English I      

Year──Grade: 9──Credit: 1      

Prerequisite: At least a "B" grade in previous level of English and/or a contract signed (at time of enrollment) by the student and parent/ guardian.

Honors English I is a course designed to prepare students for advanced study of literature and writing, including Pre-AP courses. This class is available to those who want the opportunity to achieve a weighted GPA that is over 4.0. Honors English I will include additional reading, writing, and enrichment that will provide deeper and more extensive study than English I.  Proficiency in basic skills is required.  Out-of-class reading from the ALA Best Books for Young Adults list and writing assignment are frequent.  Materials will include short stories, poetry, plays, and nonfiction which could include: Odyssey, Romeo and Juliet, House of the Scorpion, Speak, fiction and other works.  Writing assignments include two research projects/papers.  Class may include meeting outside of regular class time (i.e. before school and/or during seminar) that students

must attend.  The Honors class will include but not be limited to: completing a reading list in preparation for Pre-AP Honors English II and compiling an end of the year presentation.

Creative Writing 

Semester──Grade: 9-12──Credit: ½

Prerequisite: None

Creative Writing is for students who enjoy writing, and have an interest in developing their writing skills through

various forms of creative writing.  Though the emphasis of this course is writing, some reading is required.  Students will write creative pieces that will include multiple poems and short stories.  Other assignments may include writing for children, writing for the stage/screen, and creative nonfiction.  Students will be required to write original creative pieces, participate in class discussion, share their writing in a workshop format, and present a final portfolio.

Graphic Novels: Image and Text   

Semester──Grade: 9──Credit: ½

Prerequisite: None

Since the 1980s, the so-called graphic novel, or long-form comic, has become a popular and accomplished literary and artistic form. This evolving and hybrid medium represents, in the words of author and artist Eddie Campbell, "an emerging new literature of our times in which word, picture, and typography interact meaningfully and which is in tune with the complexity of modern life..." This course offers a survey of some of the best graphic novels of the last thirty years, while providing the skills for reading comics critically by analyzing the text and images of the panels, pages, and entire works. The graphic novels read will cover fiction and nonfiction, and both American and Japanese comics, with students making comparisons across genres and cultures.

War Literature 

Semester──Grade 9-12──Credit: 1/2

Prerequisite: None

This course will focus on poetry, fiction and nonfiction that are reflections and products of war as experiences by both the soldiers and civilians.  This course is designed for students who like to read and are interested in social issues pertaining to the military and war.  Students will also respond to literature through writing, analyzing, creating group projects, engaging in class discussions, etc. as a means of expanding their understanding of the selection.

Mythology 

Semester──Grade: 9-12──Credit: ½

Prerequisites: None

Mythology is a semester course designed to make students aware of mythology.  The study of mythology and its ancient explanations for the mysteries of the

universe will enrich students by giving them insight into their own culture and the universal concept of human experience. We will study what the myth say about the culture which produced it, how it compares to other cultures and times, and how it has influenced succeeding generations. The knowledge gained will enable the student to understand better many allusions to mythology made in every kind of literature.

English II  

Year──Grade: 10──Credit: 1

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students with language arts skills necessary for college, post-secondary endeavors, and employment.  English II provides an overview of literary elements and genres which may include: Julius Caesar,

To Kill a Mockingbird, The Pearl, Animal Farm, and authors which may include Steinbeck, Capote, Flinn, and

Hesse.  Compositions, essay responses, and research assignments are included in the course.  Daily homework may consist of reading assignments, out-of-class writing, and reviews.

English II Pre-AP   

Year──Grade: 10──Credit: 1

Prerequisite: At least a "B" grade in English I or Honors English I, or instructor permission

English ll Pre-AP is a course that emphasizes the development of advanced skills in composition and literary analysis. The course is designed to enable students to develop close reading strategies as well as higher critical thinking skills as preparation for the Advanced Placement courses at the 11th and 12th grade levels. Literary study covers nonfiction, short stories, poetry, test taking skills, analogies, etc. Samples of literature studied include, but are not limited to: Julius Caesar, The Pearl, Animal Farm, To Kill a Mockingbird, A Separate Peace, Ethan Frome, In Cold Blood, The Children's Story, Our Town, Twelve Angry Men.  Expectations for Honors English II are higher and broader than those for English II.  All daily discussions,

written work, compositions, and tests require higher-level thinking skills, mature responses, and extensive preparation outside of class.  Tests will be primarily essay in nature.  Extensive research and creative projects are assigned with most units.  All reading assignments and most writing will be done outside of class.

English III  

Year──Grade: 11──Credit: 1

Prerequisite: None

This course will provide students with the language arts skills necessary for college, post-secondary training, and employment. English III concentrates on American Literature with emphasis on the Native Americans,     

Puritans, Hawthorne, and Mark Twain. Most of the authors are studied through the use of short story selections rather than novels. Compositions, essay response, and research assignments are incorporated into the course with an emphasis on persuasive writing

strategies and skills. Four essays to be assessed using the Six-Trait Model.

AP English Language and Composition  

Year──Grade: 11──Credit: 1

Pre-requisite: A minimum of "B" in English II/ Pre-AP or instructor's permission. English II Pre-AP recommended.

Students in this introductory college-level course read and thoroughly analyze challenging prose selections, deepening their awareness of writing techniques and language. Through close reading and frequent writing about that reading, students strengthen their abilities to work with language and text with purpose and strategy, becoming more aware of both author's purpose and audience needs. They synthesize information from readings in their own compositions and cite sources according to Modern Language Association standards.

Course readings feature expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. Students examine and work with essays, letters, speech, images, and imaginative literature. As this is a college-level course, performance expectations are appropriately high, and the workload is challenging. It often involves long-term reading and

writing assignments to be done outside of class, so time management skills are essential.

English IV 

Year──Grade: 12──Credit: 1

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students with language arts skills necessary for college, post-secondary training, and employment. English IV concentrates on British Literature. The course surveys major literary periods and their work: Anglo-Saxon/Beowulf, Middle Ages/Chaucer, Renaissance/Shakespeare, the Romantics, Modern and Post-Modern Era. Compositions, essay responses, and research assignments are included in the course. One

major focus is persuasion, involving a resume and cover letter first semester and a research project second

semester. In addition, four essays are administered throughout the year and assessed on the Six-Trait Model.

AP English: Literature and Composition    

Year──Grade: 12──Credit: 1

Prerequisite: Pre-requisite: A minimum of "B" in English II/ Pre-AP or instructor's permission. English II Pre-AP recommended.

This course provides an opportunity for the senior to earn credit in high school and to simultaneously satisfy

the freshmen English requirement for most colleges. As a condition of enrollment in the AP course all students must take the AP exam administered at the end of the

course. Extensive reading, writing, and textual analysis will be required; material and instruction will be at the college level. Students may purchase some of their own texts so the books may be used for notes and kept.

Philosophy of Art and Literature 

Semester──Grade: 10-12──Credit: ½

Prerequisite: None

From Aristotle's Poetics to Banksy's Exit at the Gift Shop, thinkers have always been fascinated by the questions "What is art?" and "How do art and literature work?" Students will examine philosophical texts alongside works of art and literature as they seek their own answers to these timeless questions. Beginning in Ancient Greece, students will examine the inner workings of Greek tragedy, create descriptive writing about some important Renaissance paintings, research the many art and poetry movements of the twentieth century, and reflect on how the contemporary art world had made graffiti artists into millionaires. Students will write reflectively on essential questions related to aesthetics, the branch of philosophy that studies art, beauty, and culture.

Literacy Lab I 

Semester──Grade: 9──Credit: ½

Prerequisite: Teacher/Counselor Recommendation & Test Scores

This course is designed for students who read below their grade level.  It is designed to help these students improve their vocabulary and comprehension.  Students who score below grade level on the Gates-McGinitie, Holt, KRA, PLAN, SRI, and/or STAR may be placed in the class. Students will be required to read at home and in class.  In class they will be involved in independent and monitored reading, whole and small group instruction of reading strategies, and individualized

computer instruction in fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, and spelling.  Literacy Lab I will focus on main ideas and details, sequence, story elements, and summarization.

Literacy Lab II 

Semester──Grades: 10-12──Credit: ½

Prerequisite: Literacy Lab I and Teacher/Counselor Recommendation & Test Scores

This is a follow-up for students who have had the first four chapters of the rBook in Literacy Lab I. It is designed to help those students improve their vocabulary and comprehension.  Students who score below grade level on the Gates-McGinitie, Holt, KRA, PLAN, SRI and/or STAR may be placed in the class.  Students will be required to read at home and in class.  In class they will be involved in independent and

monitored reading, whole and small group instruction of reading strategies, and individualized computer

instruction in fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, and spelling.  Literacy Lab II focuses on problem-solution; story elements; cause and effect; comparison and contrast; and inferences.

Literacy Lab III 

Semester──Grades: 11-12──Credit: ½

Prerequisite: Literacy Lab I and/or Literacy Lab II Teacher/Counselor Recommendation & Test Scores

This is a follow-up for students who have had the first four chapters of the rBook in Literacy Lab I. It is designed to help those students improve their vocabulary and comprehension.  Students who score below grade level on the Gates-McGinitie, Holt, KRA, PLAN, SRI and/or STAR may be placed in the class.  Students will be required to read at home and in class.  In class they will be involved in independent and monitored reading, whole and small group instruction of

reading strategies, and individualized computer

instruction in fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, and spelling.  Literacy Lab III focuses on problem-solution; story elements; cause and effect; comparison and contrast; and inferences.

ELL Newcomers English I/ELL I Lab

Year──Grade: 12──Credit: 1

Prerequisite:  Enrollment permission required and teacher recommendation

These classes are designed to develop students' oral language abilities and literacy skills. Students develop oral and written competencies in understanding and generating simple sentences, questions, and commands.

Curriculum materials include, but are not limited to, the Oxford Picture Dictionary for the Content Areas, ACCESS Newcomers, and Writing Power 1.

The ELL Newcomers English I class is counted as an English credit, and the ELL I Lab class is counts toward an elective credit.  The ELL teacher meets with these students daily. 

ELL Newcomers English II

Year──Grades:  9-12──Credit: 1

Prerequisite:  Enrollment permission required and teacher recommendation

This course is an extension of skills learned in ELL Newcomers English I.  It provides students with academic and social language skills necessary to function in core curriculum classes and navigate their way through the academic setting.  ELL Newcomers English II focuses on syntax, continued vocabulary development, reading, listening, speaking and pronunciation skills, and writing pieces that demonstrate an organization of ideas and supporting elements.  The goal will be to help ELL students become more comfortable in all areas within and outside of the academic setting and increase English language proficiency.

Curriculum materials include, but are not limited to, the Oxford Picture Dictionary for the Content Areas, ACCESS Newcomers, and Writing Power 1.

The ELL Newcomers English II class counts as an English credit.   It is a year-long course that meets every other day.

ELL Tutorial

Year──Grades:  9-11──Credit: 1

Prerequisite:  Enrollment permission required and teacher recommendation

This Tier 2 MTSS class focuses on the academic language needed to be successful in core high school and college classes. In addition, students will be taught WICOR strategies to assist them in organization, higher-level questioning, and homework. It provides a combination of strategies to increase English language proficiency along with academic skill building using AVID strategies.

Materials include, but are limited to, the 3D English curriculum. 

The ELL Tutorial class counts as an elective credit. It is a year-long course that meets every other day.

ELL Strategies

Year──Grades:  10-12──Credit: 1

Prerequisite:  Enrollment permission required and teacher recommendation

This Tier 2 MTSS class provides intensive instruction on the application of strategies and skills necessary for increased independence and academic success as well as vocabulary development. Instruction is designed to improve organizational and study skills such as note taking, test taking, time management, goal-setting, and self-monitoring. Students will work in a collaborative setting and participate in collegial discussions using grade-appropriate oral and written exchanges of information, ideas, and analyses.  Life skills such as attendance, punctuality, organization, responsibility, attitude, behavior management, and effort will be reinforced.

The ELL Strategies class counts as an elective credit. It is a year-long course that meets every other day.

English III (for English Language Learners)

Year──Grade:  11──Credit: 1

Prerequisite:  Enrollment permission required and teacher recommendation; successful completion of English II or ELL Newcomers English II

This course will provide students with the language arts skills necessary for college, post-secondary training, and employment.  English III concentrates on American Literature with emphasis on the Native Americans, Puritans, Hawthorne, and Mark Twain.  Most of the authors are studied through the use of short story selections rather than novels.  Translation, modifications and adaptations are utilized based on the students' various levels of English proficiency.   Composition, essay response, and research assignments are incorporated into the course with an emphasis on argumentation writing strategies and skills.  Four essays to be assessed using the Six-Trait Model. 

This is a year-long course that meets every other day.

 

 

 

  
  

 

 

 

 Junction City High School Blue Jay